Finding Your Centre Point In A Society Gone Mad

Food Gone Mad

Food Gone Mad


I’ve spoken about these guys before ‘The Green Times’ but I’ve got to mention them again because they have a way with words that gets to me every single time with every single newsletter. I love it when words bypass the gatekeepers of your mind and fast track their own route deep into the heart of you.
Music can do that. Just this week-end, I heard a song that made me weep from a place I thought was closed. The music broke right through a defense that my mind had erected and released a part of me I’d been bottling for some time. Words are powerful and we need to use them carefully. And we need to be mindful about which ones we allow to penetrate. I always want the metaphors contained in Green Times essays to soak right in, they’re always transformative in a beautiful way, they kind of ground things that I’m feeling in the first place into a calm place of sense.
I always look forward to open my mail every month from ‘The Green Times’ and I always know to sit back and languish over the opening paragraph because of the way they use words.
This week the opening line was “If you weave in and out of challenging and encouraging news like we do, you need to find your centre in a still point. Even though our species has altered the biological life supporting systems in profound ways which will take the next few hundred years to repair – if we can now pay attention to this – Nature still offers perspective and the peace we need to tap again the strength to fight for a sustainable future”.
The more you read that line, the more powerful it becomes.
The bit that soothed me the most was the metaphor of needing to find your centre in a still point when things are overwhelming. Just thinking about that as an idea, is calming. I’m going to use it to talk to a topic that I generally find the oppositie of calming, infuriating. Children’s Parties.
I think that things are overwhelming when it comes to our society at this point in time and the Jozi Real Food Revolution, I think is my centre point, the rooting place where things all come together and where there is still because I find sense there.
We’re having some incredible conversations at the moment. I just love the tone of the mails you are sending through and the depth in our debate.
Whilst we are living in a society where real food is not the norm, and where we’re trying to raise children in a chemical age where processed and refined food is the norm, you can’t swing too far to the left I don’t believe without upsetting your child’s emotional need to be a part of the society they live in whether it’s right or wrong. You will wear yourself out trying and may risk isolating your child, I fear even with your best intentions.
If you work with society where it is at and you work within your capacity, what is your centre point? Where is your place of compromise?Where is the point where you live consciously amongst it all?
I was at yet another children’s party this week-end. My mother came with me and we were having a conversation about how difficult I find parties like this to be. If I had stuck to my guns at what is and isn’t real food, I would have had to instruct my daughter not to eat anything at that party.
There absolutely wasn’t any real food there at all. Just being there is a compromise but it’s one I’m set to make because being socially well integrated is as vital for her development as being physically healthy. In fact I do not believe I could ever create physical health for her if our way of eating is so far outside the norm that she can’t participate socially without being ‘different’ and ‘odd’ – I battle enough with that and I’m 38, that would be quite a heavy load for a 6 year old to bare.
So the middle-ground is fraught with frustration and compromise which I was lamenting to my mother while I watched the kids filing themselves with colorants and sugar. I had to stop Kiara from taking one of the drinks on offer, to add liquid colorants and liquid glucose to the list of junk to flood their systems was just more than I could handle but let me not dwell here – we need to focus on solutions and on changing the norm bit by bit joyfully and I will be doing a series on Real Food Parties.
Anyhow, my mother was getting ratty with me because I didn’t want to eat any of the snacks laid out for parents there. ‘Darling, you’ve got to eat something’, ‘I’m fine Mum, I had a good breakfast’, ‘but Darling it’s half past 2, you need to eat something’, ‘Mum, I’m not hungry and I don’t want to eat any of this, it’s not food’.
‘Oh dear Darling, is this all my fault because I wouldn’t buy you sweets as a child’ she says as she contemplates her potential role in creating this food activist monster daughter of hers, ‘Darling’, one last attempt as she points to a sausage roll on her plate ‘this is food Darling, why won’t you just have a sausage roll, this is food’ – ‘Mum! I thought you said you didn’t want to eat donkeys’!Low blow but my point was made!
She raised her hand to her mouth in horror- ‘oh, this is THAT food’. ‘Yes Mum, that’s processed food, it isn’t real food’.
So then she started asking proper questions, ‘so what is real food Darling’?
I pointed to the table full of snacks for the kids and the parents table and explained to my mother that nothing on that table came from the soil.
None of the meat in the snacks came from real farms, most of it would be conventional, that’s from a feedlot which is not a real farm. The animals from those farms don’t eat their natural diet, that’s not real food for me. There wasn’t any fresh produce from the ground or from a tree. Everything on the table either came from a factory or conveyor belt or had been made from materials that came from a factory.
The entire party was processed food.
Everything was refined and it’s in the refining and mechanization of that food that it loses its nature and its goodness and is propped up with chemicals to make the fact that it isn’t real – feasible still.
Real food comes from the soil. Real food comes from animals raised on land eating their natural diet.
There literally wasn’t anything like that at that party.
It’s time to re-visit children’s parties. I find them stressful, talking to some of you that came to chat while you were fetching your orders on Friday tells me that I’m not alone.
Let’s start a Real Party Series?
To start with, I’ll start with the main article I did on sugar in children’s diets. It was a right royal rant. I’ll include a cake that I had done at Kiaras last party – a red velvet party cake totally coloured with beetroot using organic butter in the icing that was so delicious just remembering it makes me salivate. I had it done at Junipas Cake Studio. Here is the link to the article about that party and that cake entitled ‘Mad Organic Woman Makes Her Daughter Eat Beetroot Cake– CLICK HERE.
I’ll interview Junipas shortly  to talk about that cake and ask them to help us with an article about how to use natural flavourings for baking and for party cakes. At least, let’s start with getting the colorants out as the first initiative in our ‘Real Children’s Parties’ series.
On our facebook page, there is link to an article that shows you the behavioural and health problems that have been linked to specific colorants, have a look at them and I’ll get you more information shortly on how to get natural colorants for baking and ask Junipas to talk to us about the party cakes they can do using natural colorants.
Here is the link to that rant about the normal role of ‘sugar’ in a society gone mad…

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