Who Else Sits At Your Breakfast Table?

Farm Breakfast in Jozi

Farm Breakfast in Jozi


Breakfast providence. The farms we connected to this morning. Breakfast is one meal that I think time has to be prioritized for. It sets your system up for the day.
It is a national tragedy as far as I’m concerned that instead of spending the time in the morning to connect in the kitchen before the day starts, while deeply nourishing their systems, people are filling their bowls with instant sugar laden cereals with genetically modified additives and ingredients and setting their blood sugar up for turmoil for the day and poor nutrition. It is sad for me that nowadays we expect to spend 10 minutes, if that, on breakfast and expect it to be quick. Breakfast cereal is a massive food and conveyor belt industry. It is a pity it ever happened and I cringe at what children are being given before school.
Real food is connected to real farms.  Real food is not connected to a factory pulverizing the raw product into nutritional obscurity and then making an attempt to add back some substance by adding chemicals, sugar, additives and preservatives.
One of the greatest efforts you can make in the real food revolution and your own commitment to deep nutrition is to resurrect the good old farm breakfast.
This morning, while faffing in the kitchen over breakfast with my daughter all fuzzy haired from sleep in her fluffy pajamas, I felt an overwhelming sense of love and pride when I took a look around me and saw the farms at our breakfast table. I’m privileged to be able to form a mental, vivid image of walking the actual farm because I have done so, it’s that connection I dream of creating for you so that you too are able to consciously reflect at breakfast, at lunch, at supper on the farmers that you are supporting and the real difference you are making to the environment by voting for them.
So as  I glanced across at the stove doing exactly that, I watched my daughter stirring the Uncle John’s non-GM maize meal porridge (do get a little step ladder of sorts into your kitchens so that littlies can more easily get involved in the cooking), and I thought of a very special family farm in Fouriesberg planting heirloom seed carried down through generations in their family. I thought of every generation in a kitchen eating piping hot bowls of this porridge. I thought of the incredible treasure that their original seed is, non-corporate, original seed and smiled at all those farms that are succeeding to keep tradition and nature intact while corporations run riot over nature’s providence for profit. I felt proud that in our breakfast choice we were voting for that farmer.
I had eggs on from Mandy’s farm and I thought of my favorite, local chicken farm and her plucky Boschvelders that always make me smile when I go there, pecking about at everything and anything with a plucky attitude that is distinctly Boschvelder. I thought fondly of Mandy and her little farm and her ongoing commitment to animal welfare and doing things properly and her love for her animals. I felt pride for my vote for her farm and to have that type of nutrition in my kitchen.
Next week, we are bringing you some pork to try from a free-range farmer whose pigs live in a virtual pig oasis. I had his bacon on that we’re trying for you, and I thought of Ricky and his beaming smile and his commitment to keeping pigs in the most natural environment for them. I thought of the fact that we’re voting for a farmer who does not crate them, does not confine them in a piggery, does not use antibiotics or growth hormones and feels genuine contentment when he sees his pigs mud bath for the day. The bacon is fantastic, the smoked pork is out of this world and the chops are the best I’ve eaten perhaps ever. We will be bringing Ricky’s pork to you, next week, he has given us pricing and will be dropping off his first sample stock on Monday.
Another vote for the farmer at my breakfast table. For tomato sauce, I heated some organic tinned tomatoes in the bacon drippings, there is no better real tomato sauce, and it needs nothing more than – tomatoes. 1 ingredient, the end. Converse this to the 12 – 20 additives, colorants and preservatives that make up conventional ‘tomato’ sauce. My green juice for the day is made with greens from my own garden and topped with the luscious kale from Amberskys’ organically managed, fertile, rich soil. The fact that the kale hasn’t even travelled 10km’s to arrive at my breakfast table is incredible. I feel a wave of contentment rise again in my vote for that organic, local farmer at our breakfast table. There is an organic apple from Wensleydale in the juice, pesticide free, and with soil behind it that I know doesn’t contain artificial fertilisers. I don’t have to worry about the myriad of pesticides that conventional apples are sprayed with. I also have some lemon juice in my green juice from local, unsprayed lemon trees from Aloe Dale, some more soil behind the choice that isn’t being harmed. I have also voted for biodiversity – behind all these organic choices are a host of insects, bees and birds that aren’t being harmed by pesticides, destroyed or wiped out altogether.
I stir through some raw, honey from a local passionate bee-keeper, some non-irradiated cinnamon from a spice merchant at the Bryanston Organic Market and some organic coconut oil into the maize porridge, I taste it and marvel at how strong, creamy and rich the taste is without one single additive, without any corporate or conveyor belt at my breakfast table. Rather my table is connected to a host of real farmers.
This is what it means to eat consciously. It is an entirely nourishing experience on so many levels. It is far more than nutritional nourishment, although deep nutrition is a glorious consequence. You connect to your impact on a farmer, who is connected to soil and to the cycles of life that make up a farm. When you do that, you connect to the earth and to your power to heal it choice by choice and you do.
To face the cereal box and connect consciously will take you down a trip of manipulation, a factory, a corporate, a branding company, some spin and a box of sugary empty calories. It is a vote against nature.
Bring the farmer into your kitchen and consciously connect to your food choices. This is the behaviour that shapes the Jozi Real Food Revolution and the consciousness that helps heal this disconnected old town, to something more powerful, sense, meaning, soil and to nature.
Stop, reflect, breathe, eat from a farm. Connect.
When you do so, eating becomes a very sacred and very powerful space indeed, It will enrich your life and I wish that for you.
 

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