Touching Base and Seasonal Eating..

Organic Farm Produce

Organic Farm Produce


Hi!
I’m back from leave and back in the thick of it. I know my writing has been slack of late, I have to focus on getting ready for the front store, supply challenges, catching up with admin and being a bit more focused on th e practical side of this business. It affects the time I have to write and reflect, I’m just battling to pay attention to all the different hats I need to wear for the moment, bear with me….
If you are waiting for a response to mail, please give me some time, my inbox was flooded last week, I will get back to you shortly.
The serious reflection of the day is about seasonal eating. I have to defend nature in between seasons and explain why organic farming and seasonal eating are tightly interwoven principles. I can never have a broad catalogue of produce to sell if I am selling organic and natural food. I need you to understand why spring growth cannot occur until the rains hit and why organic produce is scarce especially at this time. I’ve attempted to do that in the blog article below for those who want to get into the gritty of seasonal eating and organic farming.
Produce News – Croft chicken comes in on Friday. We have whole chickens in from the Free Range Food Company coming within the next 3 weeks.  I’ve been to see their farm, will write up the story shortly about who they are and they will be to supply us regularly with chicken so our chicken woes should ease. We’ll get from Croft, from Free Range and we have this to get us by while we wait for Mandy’s next batch.
Fruit and Vegetables – New In – Organic Mulberries and lemons, kale, spring onions, spinach, bright lights spinach, herbs, broad beans, sweet potatoes, carrots, beetroot and roast vegetable packs..
Sourdough Loaves – Fresh and warm in this morning – feedback on how you find them?
Karoo Lamb – S upply is going to get easier shortly as we’ll be using Braeside to cut for us. We’ve had several challenges with Karoo lamb, the first place it was cut at and packed in those map-packed bags was so expensive, we had to take volumes, we didn’t sell it all, we ended up having to freeze too much and map-packing didn’t do well frozen.  We were paying a ludicrously high price – a consistent challenge when you’re a small business doing meat, and we ended up making a loss on it all told.
We then moved to getting it cut at another butcher, slightly better pricing but we have to take whole carcass at a time which means cuts are limited and supply erratic. Plan c, is now that Braeside has protocols in place so they can provide us with great traceability, they will start cutting shortly for us and supply issues on the lamb should ease. Pricing will change but at least we’ll have more consistent supply. The lamb has been challenging to say the least, hopefully with our new arrangement, things will get easier shortly. We do need to find another veldt reared lamb option so that we’ve got more than 1 – the lack of alternatives keeps putting us in severe supply constraint. I’m focused on this at the moment.
Grass-Fed Beef – Similarly with beef, things are set to get easier shortly. We have more of Keith Harvey’s beef coming in next week and will start carrying the Braeside Grass-Fed, Free Range, range shortly.
It has audited protocols like Kalahari so Braeside now can offer us traceability to farm on the beef and the farms are independently audited to meet certain protocols that ensure that the beef is predominantly grass-fed, audited too by SAMIC which is fantastic news all round. It means we are getting more and more options and supply will get easier. On the website, I will create different sections for Braeside Free Range, Keith Harvey’s Grass Fed Beef and perhaps a 3rd option that may be coming shortly.
I know supply of meat has been dreadfully frustrating, it’s had us tearing our hair out on this side, but it is set to get easier shortly.
Peters Super Natural Ice-Cream – We’ve got some new ice-cream this week! I’m very excited to bring you a ‘Real Ice-Cream’ that means that when you do want a treat, you can now find something in Jozi that ticks most boxes for a real food product.
I think it’s important to represent an artisan like Peta because it is far better than conventional ice-cream. It doesn’t yet tick all the boxes but most of them. It obviously isn’t a health food, it’s not organic food, but it is real.
It is real that in this context, people eat ice-cream. If you are going to eat ice-cream sometimes or your children are going to want it, there will be times when a treat like this has its place, this is the first ice-cream I have seen in Jozi that uses milk from grass-fed, pastured cows (Bartlett Dairy, we’ll bring you his milk shortly) and has no artificial colorants or preservatives. It is an artisanal product which means it is hand crafted and doesn’t come off a conveyor belt, supporting food artisans and traditional food craft is a vital aspect of the Jozi Real Food Revolution.
The sweets inside the ice-cream are home and hand made by Peta so there are no artificial additives or colorants there either. The only box not ticked is that she does use a light corn syrup to make up 16% of the sugar content, this syrup will be GM but she is happy to replace that ingredient for us shortly and replace it with glucose.
It’s expensive, it’s clearly just for treats, if you are going to eat ice-cream, this is the most real I can find for you in Jozi right now.
She’s –  Peter Frysh – a lady passionate about bringing craft and home-made attention back to food – has given us 4 flavours to start – home-made cookies and cream, lemon yoghurt, vietnamese coffee and peanut brittle. Let me know whether this is something you would like us to stock.
I took some home last night much to my families delight! It’s not often that I bring home something that has sugar in it!
My daughter literally exclaimed that her dreams had come true!  Apparently she has fantasies about a mum that lets her eat junk food all day!
Conventional ice-cream is full of utter rubbish, colorants, preservatives, most of the sugar is gm corn syrup and it’s made from conventional dairy that uses antibiotics and growth hormone so it’s not an option in my household. This was a compromise and one that my family was very happy see me make:)
Its treat, occasional food, not everyday food!
I’ll start writing short, snappier notes on what is and isn’t out shortly once I’ve got the reins in hand a little more securely. I’m paying dearly for last week’s leave, although I can never regret spending time with my daughter, there is much to catch up on!
Have a beautiful week.
 

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